This Week in Milford

April 23, 2014

Hey, ho, way to go, Ohio

Filed under: Bad Jokes, exposition comics, freak hands, Gil Thorp, Where is Milford? — teenchy @ 4:47 am

April 23, 2014

gil140423

One of the favorite pastimes of many TWIMers is to try to figure out where, exactly, Milford and the schools Milford High plays against are located.  Today, in the course of the exposition of Conrad’s name, we learn that both Luckey and Haskins are in Ohio. Digging a little deeper, we learn that both are in Wood County, Ohio; deeper still and we can see that the only Interstate highway that could possibly have an exit for Luckey and Haskins is I-75 exit 187, north of Bowling Green.  http://www.exitexplorer.com/exit.php?e=I-75-OH-187#.U1eYalena8A

Here, then, folks, is the Interstate sign in question:

So is the Thorpiverse in northwestern Ohio, or what?

Not much else to speak of in today’s strip except to note Clumsy Amy’s subtle left-handed Vulcan salute in P1 and a nice exterior shot of the Milford Public Library in P2. Oh, and that both Clumsy Amy’s freckles and Conrad’s pointy eyelashes have disappeared today.

21 Comments »

  1. Conrad Luckey Haskins sounds like an opening act for Slim Chance and the Longshots.

    This is the most name-focused exposition the strip has seen since we learned what the “G.T.” stood for in G.T. Grayling’s name. I don’t know if that is good or bad.

    Comment by billytheskink — April 23, 2014 @ 7:19 am

  2. I’m not saying it’s bad, but I ain’t saying it’s good either. Regardless, I have to tip my hat to Teenchy on his sleuthing as it does a great job tying things together and, assuming Milford is the Detroit suburb Milford, I guess it’s not too crazy that they play lots of games in northwest Ohio.

    Incidentally, the GM test track is located in Milford so whenever I am reading a review of a GM car, I always snicker when they talk about how fast a certain car went around the Milford handling loop…

    Comment by timbuys — April 23, 2014 @ 7:25 am

  3. This confirms my guess that they’re in the public library, not the high school one.
    That makes sense. That, in turn, contradicts GT logic.

    Comment by Dale — April 23, 2014 @ 9:32 am

  4. Great work!!!!!

    Comment by tedkin — April 23, 2014 @ 9:43 am

  5. Quality sleuthin’, teenchy!

    Comment by lauramac — April 23, 2014 @ 1:40 pm

  6. So this whole plot line was to set up an anecdote about an interstate exit sign in Ohio? Why not.

    Comment by J.D. Springer — April 23, 2014 @ 1:58 pm

  7. J.D., ya think? Drove down I-75, saw the exit sign, thought “Luckey Haskins sounds like someone’s name” and concocted the entire story arc around it?

    If so, the resulting arc has been less far-fetched than the “peacock who may or may not be my late kid brother reincarnated brings hoopers luck” arc.

    Comment by teenchy — April 23, 2014 @ 5:34 pm

  8. Is Luckey Haskins one place or two?
    I have a 2010 atlas showing Luckey with a population of 989. No Haskins.

    Comment by Dale — April 23, 2014 @ 5:47 pm

  9. wow – great work so early in the morning. So the place actually exists – without this blog I’d have scoffed and flipped the paper. Amazing how we have a library in our own basement.

    Comment by robmize2013 — April 23, 2014 @ 6:03 pm

  10. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskins,_Ohio

    Here is info on Haskins Ohio.

    Comment by robmize2013 — April 23, 2014 @ 6:08 pm

  11. Two places, Rob. Look at the “municipalities of Wood County” at the bottom of that page and you’ll see Luckey as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luckey,_Ohio

    Comment by teenchy — April 23, 2014 @ 6:11 pm

  12. Luckey was named for Captain James B. Luckey, who served in the US Army from 1861 to 1864. In 1879 he bought 180 acres of land and built a saw mill on the site of the village. In 1881 Isaac Krotzer surveyed the town, and several businesses were established including a post office, stave factory, and hotel.

    –from Wikipedia

    Comment by robmize2013 — April 23, 2014 @ 6:11 pm

  13. I was answering Dales comment that he couldnt find Luckey.

    Comment by robmize2013 — April 23, 2014 @ 6:12 pm

  14. So when does Isaac Krotzer show up in the strip? Team doctor? Opposing player?

    Comment by teenchy — April 23, 2014 @ 6:12 pm

  15. Gotcha on 13, Rob. Sorry ’bout that.

    Comment by teenchy — April 23, 2014 @ 6:13 pm

  16. A couple of years ago, I must have driven past that exit at least a dozen times coming and going from Detroit to Findlay on business… I cannot ever recall making note of it.

    This post does make me want to make a semi-dirty joke about the exact circumstances under which Ma and Pa Haskins decided to name their kid after an interstate exit sign… wink, wink, nudge, nudge, say no more!

    Comment by timbuys — April 23, 2014 @ 6:28 pm

  17. […] I grew Up on the freeways” “Have you heard of Luckey Haskins?“ “I am mov- ing to the Valley” I am thinking Of […]

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  18. […] to see the Milford Public Library stay relatively […]

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  19. […] of firing any more synapses to predict that outcome, I prefer to shift my focus to ponder the Milford Public Library and its parameters. How late does it stay open? Is it adequately heated? Did it get its start as a […]

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  20. […] ** His real name, not one made up for this comic strip – and, I’m guessing, no relation to Conrad Luckey Haskins. […]

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  21. […] would spend as much time developing characters and dialogue as he does giving them wacky names and explaining their origins, Gil Thorp might actually be an interesting […]

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